Bacterial Meningitis; Transmission, Symptoms, Treatment & Vaccine

Bacterial meningitis vaccine

Bacterial meningitis vaccine
Bacterial meningitis vaccine

Don’t worry, because vaccines come to the rescue. Fortunately, we have vaccines for this deadly disease that can effectively protect our children. We have 3 vaccines against the most 3 common types of bacteria that can cause bacterial meningitis: meningococcal vaccine help protect against Neisseria meningitis, pneumococcal vaccine can help protect against streptococcus pneumonia and Hib vaccine can help protect against Haemophilus influenza. Vaccines aren’t perfect, but they are good enough to make us feel more relieved. Up to half of the children who get the vaccine may feel pain or fever, which rapidly goes away.

All 11 to 12 year olds should get a single dose of a MenACWY vaccine. The CDC recommends a booster dose at age 16 as well. The booster dose gives teens continued protection during these ages, when they are at highest risk. We protect the babies from getting infection by type b streptococcus by treating the infected mother with the appropriate antibiotic once a positive case is detected. To prevent the listeria infection, pregnant mother are advised not to eat special types of food during their pregnancy, which may lead them to acquire listeria infection. Soft cheeses, for example, are not advised because they are made of unpasteurized milk, which is estimated to be up to 160 times more likely to cause listeria infection. This is why every pregnant mother should make sure that the dairy products she eats are from a trusted source to avoid her food being contaminated and they are made with pasteurized milk, which reduce the risk of getting infection. Raw sprouts also require humidity, considered the best condition if you want to grow bacteria as well. This is why eating raw sprouts can increase your risk of getting listeria infection, among other types of infections.

Bacterial meningitis, Meningitis